Tech-strong Korea has edge in evolution to future city: New Cities chair

2017.06.09 13:55:31 | 2017.07.12 09:07:26
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MBN CEO Chang Seung-joon (from left of the first row), New Cities Foundation Chairman John Rossant, Incheon Metropolitan Council Chairman Jegar Won-yeong and Incheon Free Economic Zone Commissioner Lee Young-geun listen to a keynote speech delivered by Incheon City Mayor Yoo Jeong-bok, at the sixth New Cities Summit held on Thursday in Songdo, Incheon. [photo by Kim Jae-hoon]

MBN CEO Chang Seung-joon (from left of the first row), New Cities Foundation Chairman John Rossant, Incheon Metropolitan Council Chairman Jegar Won-yeong and Incheon Free Economic Zone Commissioner Lee Young-geun listen to a keynote speech delivered by Incheon City Mayor Yoo Jeong-bok, at the sixth New Cities Summit held on Thursday in Songdo, Incheon. [photo by Kim Jae-hoon]

Digital cities are the new global trend and the revolution in transportation means would define future urban lives, said New Cities Foundation Chairman John Rossant.

South Korea has a head start in the urban evolution thanks to corporate assets like Hyundai Motor and Samsung Electronics, Rossant in Korea for the two-day New Cities Summit 2017 held in Songdo Incheon from Thursday told the Maeil Business Newspaper.

New Cities Foundation Chairman John Rossant

New Cities Foundation Chairman John Rossant

The sixth annual conference touched on the theme of ‘Thriving Cities: The Building Blocks of Urban Wellbeing’ with more than 800 attendees from 50 countries.

Rossant said that Internet of Things (IoT), big data and autonomous driving system would shape the future cities, calling upon governments to begin serious debate to back the evolution towards digitalization and smarter cities.

Over 250 million vehicles in the United States take up parking spaces that could cover the entire state of Connecticut. Autonomous vehicles would raise efficiency in use of cars and lessen the demand for parking spaces.

Cities, not countries, would be competing in the future, and Korean cities backed by advanced technologies of companies like Hyundai Motor and Samsung Electronics would be in advantage, he said.

Big data would be central in defining future-concept metropolis, other lecturers agreed.

More attention should be given to public safety, medical care, transportation, and energy to ensure good living conditions, and big data can be used as the guidance, they said.

By Kim Gi-jung, Sohn Dong-woo and Kim In-oh

[ⓒ Pulse by Maeil Business News Korea & mk.co.kr, All rights reserved]

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